Last edited by Shaktik
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

2 edition of Coade artificial stone found in the catalog.

Coade artificial stone

Christopher Newbery

Coade artificial stone

finds from the site of the Coade manufactory at Lambeth.

by Christopher Newbery

  • 182 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Caption title.

ContributionsCoade, Eleanor and Co.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19386026M

  Alison Kelly, who has died aged , spent 17 years researching Coade stone, the ceramic artificial stone made by the remarkable entrepreneur Eleanor Coade in a .   Buy Mrs. Coade's Stone First Edition by Kelly, Alison (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1.

Posted on Aug Episode: Mrs. Coade’s remarkable stones. Today, architectural historian Margaret Culbertson tells about a woman who made artificial stone. The South Bank Lion in Coade stone, at the south end of Westminster Bridge, London German doorway in cast stone Small replicas of Swedish rune stones, made of artificial stone A plaque set in the concrete of a sidewalk on Columbia Avenue in Cape May, New Jersey, USA. It reads "Artificial Stone Vulcanite Paving Co, Office Green St, Philada" [Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA].

In , the Library received, as a bequest, the research and teaching slides of Alison Kelly, an expert on the work of Eleanor Coade. These slides complement another of our collections, London Architecture Online. Eleanor Coade was a brilliant businesswoman who, in the late eighteenth century, developed a formula for the manufacture of artificial stone. This ceramic ‘stone’ developed and refined in the influential Lambeth manufactory founded in , by impressive eighteenth century business woman of influence Eleanor Coade ( ), became a game changer for the architectural industry.


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Coade artificial stone by Christopher Newbery Download PDF EPUB FB2

Coade stone was a material developed in the 18th century comprised of a mix of clay, terracotta, silicates, and glass. It was, in fact, a type of ceramic, which once fired produced a. In Mrs Coade bought Daniel Pincot’s struggling artificial stone business at Kings Arms Stairs, Narrow Wall, Lambeth, a site now under the Royal Festival Hall.

This business developed into Coade's Artificial Stone Manufactory with Eleanor in charge, such that within two years () she fired Pincot for 'representing himself as the chief proprietor'. Eleanor Coade (3 June – 16 November ) was a Georgian businesswoman who successfully ran an artificial stone manufactory in London.

There are many examples of Coade stone which still exist today including the King’s Statue, Weymouth. Coade stone was a ceramic material that has been described as an artificial was first created by Mrs Eleanor Coade (Elinor Coade, ), and sold commercially from to The building boom in London, at this time, led to a high demand for ornate features to decorate and adorn brick-built Georgian houses.

The showrooms of Mrs Coade's Artificial Stone Company, in. Coade stone was fired clay made using a special formula, but it was marketed as 'artificial stone' since at that Coade artificial stone book stone was the preferred material for architectural decoration.

This book charts the history of Coade stone, the techniques of production, the sculptors who provided designs, and. Anyway, most writers about Coade and Coade stone find his bankruptcy hard to explain.

Perry’s Bankrupt Gazette, October They argue that either Croggon’s market was undermined when cement-based artificial stone appeared on the market, because it substantially reduced production costs or they follow the line taken by Alison Kelly, Coade. CHAPTER 15 COADE'S ARTIFICIAL STONE WORKS [See pla 38 and ] It is beyond the normal scope of this survey to give a detailed account of an industry which has long since ceased to function and whose buildings have disappeared, but Coade stone was so extensively used on buildings and for statuary during the 70 years that the factory flourished, in the immediate neighbourhood, in.

Eleanor Coade set up in business manufacturing artificial stone inworking with all the eminent Georgian architects including Soane, who used a frieze described as 'no. ' in one of his earliest dated buildings, a house at Adam's Place, Southwark in Eleanor Coade’s mix for her imitation stone was thought lost until Philip Thomason set out to recreate it.

The best new books of the week; by which artificial stone and marble is made. A descriptive catalogue of Coade's artificial stone manufactory at King's Arms stairs, narrow-wall, Lambeth: opposite White-hall stairs.

With prices affixed. by Coade's artificial stone manufactory. Digitised book from the collection of the National Art Library, Victoria and Albert Museum, uploaded by library staff. Addeddate.

Coade is an artificial stone that was invented in the 18th century. It was widely used for freestanding statuary and monuments, architectural detailing and even garden furniture.

Hundreds of examples can be seen across Britain. The stone was named after Eleanor Coade, who ran a successful manufactory in south London for many years. This lecture tells the story of Mrs Coade and the stone that. Eleanor Coade (3 June – 16 November ) was a British businesswoman known for manufacturing Neoclassical statues, architectural decorations and garden ornaments made of Lithodipyra or Coade stone for over 50 years from until her death.

She should not be confused or conflated with her mother, also named Eleanor. Lithodipyra ("stone fired twice") was a high-quality, durable. The South London business developed into ‘Coade’s Artificial Stone Manufactory’ and business flourished under Eleanor Coade, unmarried but assuming the title ‘Mrs’.

However Pincot’s involvement ended abruptly in when she publicly dissociated him from the business for representing himself as the chief proprietor. First marketed at the turn of the s, Coade stone was a remarkable new building material.

Using a recipe which was not fully understood until the s, its makers claimed to have produced the first ever ‘artificial stone’.

Tough and hard-wearing, it offered new opportunities for fine-detailed decoration. Just as extraordinary as the stone was the person who sold it: Eleanor Coade, one. Coade is an artificial stone that was invented in the 18thC. Widely used for freestanding statuary and monuments, architectural detailing and even garden furniture.

This lecture tells the story of Mrs Coade and the artificial stone that made her one of the most successful businesswomen in the late ’s. Episode: Mrs. Coade's remarkable stones. Today, architectural historian Margaret Culbertson tells about a woman who made artificial stone.

Engineered stone is the latest development of artificial stone. A mix of marble or quartz powder, resin, and pigment is cast using vacuum oscillation to form blocks. Slabs are then produced by cutting, grinding, and polishing.

Some factories have developed a special, low-viscosity, high-strength polyester resin to improve hardness, strength, and gloss and to reduce water absorption.

The text lists items, made of 'Coade stone' (a weather-resistant ceramic material) in Neoclassical style. (Most were designed by the sculptor, John Bacon, R.A., who worked for the firm from ca. to his death in ). Coade stone in Georgian architecture - Volume 28 - Alison Kelly. 3 Mrs Nancy Valpy’s recent researches have brought to light the names of several hitherto unknown makers active for short periods in Eleanor Coade’s early years.

Mrs Valpy studied the entries in the Daily Advertiser, an advertising paper which exists in a complete run only in the Library of Congress in Washington.

George Coade died bankrupt in and later that year, a Eleanor joined forces with Pincott. Pincott presumably bought knowledge of the formula and the process of manufacturing the artificial stone, and Eleanor presumably brought the money, and the management skills that she would have acquired running her shop.

Situated along the promenade of a seaside village on the outskirts of Edinburgh are three pillars made from a malleable artificial stone called Coade, which is named after its inventor Elenor.Author: Eleanor Coade (British, –) Subject of book: Coade's Artificial Stone Manufactory (London) Publisher: J.

Strahan (London) Published in: London. Date: Medium: Illustrations: etching, engraving. Dimensions: 9 1/16 x 11 11/16 x 1 1/8 in. (23 x x cm) Classification: Books. Credit Line: Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, A descriptive catalogue of Coade's artificial stone manufactory at King's Arms Stairs, Narrow-wall Lambeth: Collection of British art from the Elizabethan period to the present day, including paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, rare books, and manuscripts.